Leigh

Scroll to Info & Navigation

The thing with the War on Drugs is it tries to deal with a health problem as if it was a legal problem. Addiction is an effect of human unhappiness and human suffering. When people are distressed, they want to soothe their distress. When people are in pain, they want to soothe their pain. So the real question is, not “Why the addiction?” but “Why the pain?”

Dr. Gabor Maté in The House I Live In (via amelancholybaby)

Israeli singer Shai Tsabari and I have something in common: We both admire poetry by Haviva Pedaya, a contemporary Jewish philosopher.

She is a brown-eyed mystic, born in Jerusalem, to a dynasty of Sephardic Kabbalah scholars from Iraq. Her Hebrew compositions have won so many prizes that it’s hard to keep track. If you dig feminist Jewish poets with a spiritual slant and an eye for keen wordplay, Haviva probably wrote your next favorite jam.

Shai recently set some of her verses to music for a song in his new album. (Shai Tsabari hails from a Yemenite family in Jaffa. He learned folks songs from his grandmother and the art of religious singing from his father.)

Here’s our makeshift English translation of his new song, The King:

"The king brings me to your chamber/ I waited for so long /and I’ve seen nothing else/ I swear I won’t peek/ and it’s easy for me to keep my promise/ because I only have eyes for you…There, I will give you my tears…"

These verses by Haviva were inspired by the Song of Songs, the only book of the Bible focused solely on passionate love.

Each generation grapples with love in its own words. One of my poems inspired by the biblical Song of Songs was published this summer in Poetica Magazine. (Click here to read excerpts from Shulamite’s Psalm by Leigh Cuen.) 

Despite the nightmares of war, or maybe precisely because of the situation, many artists in Tel Aviv spent this summer pondering the pains of love. Even these lyrics of rapture are tinged with sorrow. 

Autumn is almost here. Where did the time go?

nprbooks:

Authors love to use mixtapes as plot devices, but as Slate’s Dee Lockett points out, they rarely share the actual tracklists. (“Even Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity, in which the main character is obsessed with mixtapes, doesn’t reveal a full tracklist.”)
So Lockett compiled Spotify playlists for those rare books (and movies) that practice full mixtape transparency. (There’s even a playlist for the Eleanor & Park mixtape that’s all Joy Division’s “Love Will Tear Us Apart” on loop.) Get your headphones out and enjoy.
-Nicole
Image via c0cain3-cavi4r.tumblr.com

nprbooks:

Authors love to use mixtapes as plot devices, but as Slate’s Dee Lockett points out, they rarely share the actual tracklists. (“Even Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity, in which the main character is obsessed with mixtapes, doesn’t reveal a full tracklist.”)

So Lockett compiled Spotify playlists for those rare books (and movies) that practice full mixtape transparency. (There’s even a playlist for the Eleanor & Park mixtape that’s all Joy Division’s “Love Will Tear Us Apart” on loop.) Get your headphones out and enjoy.

-Nicole

Image via c0cain3-cavi4r.tumblr.com